Late Summer Veggie Saute - Sweet & Savory Kitchens

Aunt Suzy says . . . 

I’ve been making these sautés for a while now, using veggies that are in abundance this time of year.  The source of my idea was this sweet corn sauté from a couple of years ago. I thought it would be delicious with other vegetables and maybe some pasta. And maybe a little Parmesan . . . what’s not to like when Parmesan cheese is part of the equation?!! This is ultra flexible and the “3-Ways” reference is that it can be served as a side with a couple of variations and as a vegetarian main dish with small pasta shapes added. I made it last night in about 45 minutes, including chopping and cooking the pasta. Pretty fast, I would say!

Late Summer Veggie Saute - Sweet & Savory Kitchens

Margaux says…

When Aunt Suzy mentioned a new easy pasta dish for dinner, I was all for it! I love the sweet corn saute dish that she mentioned, and make it pretty often in the summer. I loved the idea of adding pasta to it, along with the kale, zucchini and tomatoes. And it’s beautiful when you add the tomatoes! We were all oohing and aaahing about it while I was taking photos.  I will definitely be making this again before summer is over. It’s delicious with the pasta and Parmesan!

Late Summer Veggie Saute with Pasta - Sweet & Savory Kitchens

 

Late Summer Veggie Saute

Ingredients

2 tablespoons olive oil

1 tablespoon butter

1 medium yellow onion, cut in thick slices then in quarter rounds

1 tablespoon fresh thyme, or 1 teaspoon dried

2 tablespoons fresh oregano, chopped or 1 1/2 teaspoons dried

4-5 small garlic cloves, or to taste

2-3 ears of sweet corn, husked and kernels cut from the cobs

1 bunch Lacinato (Tuscan) kale, tough stems removed and cut in 1/4-inch slices cross-wise

1 zucchini, small dice (optional)

10-12 large cherry or grape tomatoes, cut in half lengthwise

1/2 pound pasta, small shapes of your choice, regular or whole wheat, cooked al dente, 1/4 cup pasta water reserved

1/4 cup basil leaves, cut in chiffonade

Grated Parmesan cheese

Salt and pepper to taste

Directions

Prepare all veggies before starting cooking because there is no time to chop once the cooking is started!  Place a large saute pan over medium heat and add the olive oil. Once it is shimmering, add the butter. When butter is melted and bubbling, add the onions and turn up heat slightly. Cook the onions for about 5 minutes till they become translucent. Add the thyme, oregano and garlic and stir/cook for about a minute. Add the sweet corn and cook, stirring for 2 minutes. Add the kale ( and optional zucchini if using) and cook stirring for about 3 minutes. Put a lid on the pan and cook another 2-3 minutes. You can serve this as a side dish – way #1.

However, if you want to keep going, add the tomatoes. Cook for 2-3 minutes stirring then place a lid on the pan and cook another minute or two. This is way #2 – an awesome side dish as well! Maybe add the fresh basil or serve as is.  To make the main dish with pasta, add the pasta to the veggies with a little of the reserved water. Stir to combine completely and add the fresh basil. Once served pass the Parmesan!

 

 

 

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Bow-tie pasta with sun-dried tomatoes and artichoke hearts
Aunt Suzy says . . . 

Randy made this really delicious pasta last fall, and I’ve been bugging him about it since we decided to do Pasta Wednesdays here at S&SK.  He finally brought over the cookbook where he found the recipe, Italian Light and Easy, a favorite standby of his originally published in 1993.  He pointed out the recipe he thought he used, but couldn’t exactly remember.  It used all the ingredients you see in this post except it was for a cold pasta salad!  I distinctly remembered that he served it as a hot dish, so I thought he must have improvised, which is what I did.  Not only is this dish Italian ” light and easy” it was lightning fast to put together, which fits perfectly with the Pasta Wednesday concept. This can be made in 30-minutes tops.  Serve with a green salad and a nice, crisp bottle of Pinot Grigio and you’re set for a great weeknight meal.

1 9-ounce package frozen artichoke hearts

1/2 cup drained oil-packed sun-dried tomatoes, 1/2-inch dice

1 teaspoon balsamic vinegar

10 ounces Farfalle (bow-tie) pasta – regular, whole wheat or GF

2 tablespoons olive oil

8-10 fresh basil leaves, cut in chiffonade

1/4 cup flat leaf parsley, chopped

Salt and pepper to taste

1/2 cup Parmigiano Reggiano

Cook the artichoke hearts according to package directions.  Drain.  When cool enough to handle, cut into 1-inch pieces and set aside.

Place the diced tomatoes into a small bowl and add the balsamic.  Set aside.

Cook the pasta al dente according to package directions.  Save 1/2 cup pasta water and then drain and rinse the pasta.

While pasta is cooking, place the olive oil in a large saute pan (large enough to hold the pasta and other ingredients) and heat to medium.  After draining the pasta, place it in the preheated pan.  Stir to coat.  Add the reserved tomatoes and artichoke hearts and a little of the pasta water.  Stir to combine, adding more water if it is too dry.  Stir in the basil and parsley, salt and pepper.  Once all is thoroughly combined, you can either add the Parmigiano and continue stirring till melted or pass the cheese for people to add to their individual serving.

COOK’S NOTES:  I think this dish is perfect for whole wheat pasta which added a distinct flavor.  I imagine if you don’t have Balsamic vinegar on hand, that red wine would work as well.

Aunt Suzy says . . .

When I lived in Boston in the 80’s, this dish was served in many restaurants in the North End Italian neighborhood.  This simple, yet flavorful pasta dish  was new to me.  I immediately loved it and ordered it often.  One of my favorite restaurants, L’Osteria, made the best rendition so I asked them for the recipe.  It’s so simple!  Olive oil, garlic, red peppers, chicken, pasta and cheese.  I see that L’Osteria is still open and still serves this dish, Chicken Maccheroni & Broccoli.  So if you are in Boston, I recommend that you check them out.  But if  not, you can make this dish easily and authentically following my recipe. Excellent with a fruity Pinot Grigio or a light Italian Red, like a Valpolicella.

Serves 4 as a main dish and 6 as a first course (quantities easily adjusted up or down)

1-2 chicken breasts, depending on whether you want more or less chicken

4-6 cups broccoli florets

3/4-1 pound medium pasta shapes, (like the rigatoni shown or ziti, rotini, radiatore, cavatappi, etc.)

1/4 cup EV Olive Oil

2-3 garlic cloves, thinly sliced

1/2-1 teaspoon red pepper flakes, to taste

1/2-3/4 cup shredded cheese, Pecorino Romano or Parmigiano Reggiano

Season the chicken with salt and pepper only or also with your choice of herbs/spices.  I use Italian Street Fair, a blend of smoked peppers, onion, garlic, fennel and spices.  Cook the seasoned chicken breasts until just done, 4-6 minutes a side, depending on thickness.   I used my stovetop panini press, but a grill pan, broiler or gas or charcoal grill would work.   Set aside to cool slightly.  When cooled, slice the chicken in roughly 1/4 x 1 1/2-inch pieces.

Steam the broccoli to al dente and set aside.  Cook the pasta to al dente according to package directions.  Before draining, save 1/2 cup pasta water.  Drain the pasta, rinse and set aside.

Heat a large dutch oven over a medium burner.  Add the olive oil and heat till shimmering.  Add the garlic and red pepper flakes.  Saute for about 2 minutes, stirring constantly so the garlic doesn’t burn.

Add the chicken and broccoli and stir to thoroughly blend and heat.

Add the pasta and pasta water.  Stir to blend.  Place the lid on the pot and heat for about 5 minutes until all is piping hot.  You can serve as is and pass the cheese or for a creamier dish, you can add the cheese and stir to blend till melted.  I recommend stirring in the cheese only if you don’t anticipate left-overs.  If you know you’ll have left-overs, it’s easier to heat up the dish later without the added cheese.

COOKS NOTES:  Many recipes suggest you cut the chicken into bite-size pieces and cook along with the garlic and hot pepper and then add the cooked broccoli.  I think this makes for rubbery chicken pieces, but if you’re in a hurry this could be an option.  I used 1 1/2 chicken breasts this time and thought this was a perfect amount.  I had 4 cups of broccoli and wished it would have been 5 cups.  This dish definitely stands up to whole wheat pasta.  While I think Parmigiano is more authentic, I prefer this dish with the earthier and creamier sheep’s milk Romano.  Don’t be daunted by all the steps.   This is a great weeknight recipe that comes together really fast.  This is also served in restaurants with shrimp or vegetarian/no meat or seafood.

Aunt Suzy says . . . .

I saw this recipe in Food & Wine this month and since it has fall vegetables paired with some of my favorite aromatics and ingredients, I thought I’d give it a try.  I thought it sounded good, but was delighted by how delicious it was – it way outstripped my expectations!  Of course, I made adaptations – I can’t help but tinker!  I thought this would be too difficult to eat with bucatini, so instead used a my favorite small pasta shape, fusilli bucati.  I think other small pasta shapes would be excellent, or you might want to try the bucatini of the original recipe.  (Actually, I think this would make a great side vegetable dish without the pasta.) You might be inclined to skip the toasted breadcrumbs, but I would advise against this.  They added both flavor and texture and, to me, really made the dish.  A bonus is that this took only about 30 minutes start to finish!  We served this with roasted salmon and an Italian Orvieto white wine.  I will definitely make this again!

Ingredients

The Bread Crumbs
2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
1/2 cup dry bread crumbs
The Pasta
3/4 pound small pasta shapes
1/2 cup reserved pasta cooking water
The Vegetable Mixture
1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil
3/4 pound cauliflower florets, cut in 1-inch pieces (about 4 cups)
3/4 pound brussels sprouts, halved or quartered if large (about 3 cups)
Salt and freshly ground black pepper
1 small onion, finely diced
2-3 large garlic cloves, minced
1/2 teaspoon crushed red pepper
1-1/2 teaspoons chopped rosemary
1-1/2 teaspoons chopped thyme
Finishing
1/2 cup freshly grated Parmigiano Reggiano, plus more for serving

Directions

In a small skillet, heat the 2 tablespoons of olive oil. Add the bread crumbs and cook over moderately high heat, stirring, until golden and crisp, about 4 minutes. Season with salt and transfer to a bowl and set aside.

In a large pot of boiling salted water, cook the pasta until al dente. Drain the pasta, reserving 1/2 cup of the cooking water.

While the pasta is cooking, heat 1/4 cup of the oil on medium-high heat in a large saute pan. Add the cauliflower and brussels sprouts and season with salt and black pepper.  Cook over moderately high heat, stirring, until lightly charred and crisp-tender, about 5 minutes. Add 1/4 cup of the oil to the skillet along with the onion, garlic, crushed red pepper, rosemary and thyme; cook, stirring, until the onion is slightly softened, about 3 minutes. Cover and cook over low heat until the cauliflower and sprouts are tender, about 3 more minutes. Keep warm.

Add the pasta and reserved cooking water to the vegetables and cook over moderate heat, tossing, until the water is nearly absorbed. Remove from the heat and stir in the 1/2 cup of grated cheese.  Serve the pasta in wide bowls, passing the bread crumbs and additional cheese at the table. (Alternatively, you can skip stirring the cheese into the pasta and add it instead to individual servings along with the bread crumbs.)

Aunt Suzy says

I know that you will say this sounds weird – I did when I first learned about it from the owner of Shepherd’s Way Farms, a local Minnesota cheesemaker.  Usually they just offer cheese at the Mill City Farmer’s Market, but one day last summer he had a few bunches of turnips  for sale with beautiful greens attached.  I love cooked turnip greens and these looked great and were the first of the season.  I told him I was buying the turnips for the greens and he introduced me to this recipe for the turnip root.  Shepherd’s Way makes a cheese called Friesiago, which is a sheeps’ milk cheese in the style of Asiago that works well in this dish.  The recipe I found on the internet calls for Parmigiano Reggiano, which is fabulous, of course.  I imagine that Parmigiano, Asiago or Peccorino Romano would all work well – as well as the Friesiago.  So why will you say that this sounds weird?  Because this “risotto” doesn’t have rice in it. It’s a dish made in the classic risotto method, but the turnips substitute for the rice.  I hope you try it – it is delicious!  Turnips are available at the farmer’s markets now through the first frost – the ones shown here are from Loon Organics (another favorite producer!) which is right across from Shepherd’s Way at Mill City.

3 tablespoons EV olive oil

1 red onion, diced to 1/8-inch (I used red spring onions as shown)

1 1/2 pounds turnips, peeled and diced to 1/8-inch

2 cups hot chicken stock

2 tablespoons unsalted butter (or less)

1/2 cup Parmigiano Reggiano cheese, finely grated

1/2 cup parsley, finely chopped

Salt and pepper to taste

Warm the chicken stock.  Pour the olive oil into a large skillet over medium heat.  Add the onion and cook until softened, 6-8 minutes.  Add the turnips and cook for another 3-5 minutes, until they begin to soften.  Add a little of the hot chicken stock and cook over medium-high heat until absorbed, stirring constantly.  Continue with this method until all the stock has been added and absorbed, approximately 15 minutes.  Season with salt and pepper.  Add the butter and greated cheese and stir to blend.  Remove from heat, place in a serving bowl and garnish with the parsley.

Serving suggestions: This can be served as a main dish or as a side dish.  It’s great with grilled or roasted chicken.  A white Cotes du Rhone or a rich Sicilian white pairs nicely.